Home Pub bar Renovation plans for the Blue Bell pub in Warrington town center

Renovation plans for the Blue Bell pub in Warrington town center

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ONE of Warrington town center’s most popular and historic pubs is about to be refurbished in a bid to revive the custom.

Plans have been submitted to Warrington Borough Council’s planning department for an internal refurbishment of The Blue Bell.

Proposals for the Grade II listed building on the corner of Horsemarket Street and Lyme Street include new flooring, decoration and cladding for the shopping area, and a complete refurbishment of the ladies’ toilets.

The existing position of the bar would be adapted, with an existing store room to the rear of the kitchen unit to be demolished to create a larger open plan kitchen and pan washing area.

The Blue Bell pub was last refurbished in early 2016

Meanwhile, the side entrance from Horsemarket Street would be blocked off to create an internal display and designated area for live bands to perform, without affecting the flow of the bar area.

A document submitted as part of the application reads: “The proposal is a modest program to improve the general operation and appearance of the internal trade area.

“The aim is to provide visual impact of the bar counter change and renovation to drive cocktail and liquor sales as part of a new marketing and rebranding strategy.

“The pub currently markets itself as a typical traditional pub, but the refurbishment and rebranding is aimed at attracting new customers and tourists who frequent the newly developed bars and restaurants surrounding the new Warrington Market.”

The Blue Bell pub was last refurbished in early 2016

The Blue Bell pub was last refurbished in early 2016

He adds: ‘The idea behind the current scheme is to rebrand the pub to attract both existing loyal customers and new customers visiting the area through the development of the new Warrington Market.

“Loyal patrons are already eagerly awaiting the latest refurbishment of this locally-loved public house, particularly given the number of pubs closing due to the ripple effects of the pandemic the UK has suffered this year.”

The pub received a facelift in early 2016, reopening after a fortnight of internal and external renovations at a cost of £140,000.

Changes included new decor, more seating, improved lighting, completely new toilets and the repainting of the pub’s old gas lamps.